Weekend quote – Gingihan


November 27, 2015
Yossi Sheriff

At the 11th century, two identical twins were born in the central district of Beijing, Chen Chao and Chen Zaogao.

Zaogao was an extremely strong child. He grew up to be invincible, a war lord in charge of many warriors at the vicinity of the Amur river. Zaogao loved to drink, eat meat and fight. He also loved the affluent life but he did not neglect cultivating his power. Zaogao was a renowned sword master, a superb archer and an experienced hunter. Zaogao surrounded himself with elite soldiers and commanders and a loyal unit of bodyguards. Those he suspected, he executed himself.
He lived at the top fortified room, up the strong tower, inside the immense fortifications of his own, huge, castle, BaifangZi. Zaogao was big as a mountain, his face were red like the wine he loved so much, his eyes fierce and his temper short.

One morning Zaogao woke from a bad dream, stood up to say something, got a cardiac arrest and dropped dead immediately.

His brother, Chen Chao had a natural gift for painting and calligraphy when he was a small kid. When he was ten years old, after reading about it in an old manuscript, he succeeded in doing a Prana Bindu freeze for three days, at fifteen he could control his kundalini with a system of redirecting the force in the soshumna nadi, at twenty he got certified as a master in the Gelug-pa order and at twenty five he retired to a cave in the Pamir mountains and practiced Dzogchen meditation using astral projection under Atisha himself. Chao maintained a superb health by cultivating his Tapas in the snow, eating the local mountain honey and doing a daily practice of Yoga Chakra.
At forty Chen was fair skinned as a child, with bright eyes and a wonderful smile that betrayed his strong sense of all encompassing love.

One morning Chen woke up, went out of his cave to pee and got devoured by a patient snow leopard that has been waiting for this breakfast the whole night.

The one that guarded the exterior, got killed by the interior.
The one that cultivated the interior, got eaten by the exterior.


Image CC by Maurice Koop