Posts from September 2007

Another record number of viewers for a MMA, UFC 75 event


September 16, 2007
Shimi Blat

September 11th, 2007, was another record high for what emerges to be the 21st century top rising spectator sport: The mixed martial arts.
A record number of 4.7 million viewers watched the UFC 75 event at the cable and online TV, these numbers peaked at 5.6 million people for the bout between UFC light heavyweight champion Quinton “Rampage” Jackson and PRIDE champ Dan Henderson.
The important demographic fact is that these viewers were mainly young men between the ages of 18-45, just the ages most advertisers seek.
image
This surpassed any other sport event for this period of the year and leads the way towards more money invested at the MMA sport, money that will treacle down to better fighters, better training methods and a wider participating audience. The MMA field is destined to be one of the most promising sports in the 21st century.
Via the UFC web site

Japan no longer in the Judo ruling board of International Judo Federation


September 11, 2007
Viztum

Yasuhiro Yamashita, the Olympian Judo legend, was expelled earlier this week from the IJF, the International Judo Federation Executive Committee.
image
The move comes as another blow to the traditional Japanese sport, many changes were passed on for the sake of popularity and TV visibility, and it is now feared that the political defeat of Yamashita symbolizes the take over of a westernized media driven Point of view in Judo.
link to the article in The straight times
link to the IJF site, with Yamashita in the board, still not updated…
Portal Judo, All the Judo techniques in video

Fighting spirit and a warrior’s insight


September 10, 2007
Carmel Zitronblat

By Carmel Zitronblat

In our daily life we can aspire to be decisive but calm. Every action that we will do in this frame of mind will be simpler and correct. We can see a simple example for this in a test we attempt to answer. If we encounter a difficult question and stress accordingly we will perform below our abilities.

As practitioners of martial art it is important that we get acquainted with the inner feelings in a violent confrontation and aim to be in the best inner attitude to deal with these situations.

Soldiers who fight professionally learn very few techniques. A soldier learns a limited number of rote reactions to many situations. It seems to me as the basic level of being a warrior; it is most suitable to armies where you never have enough time to learn a large variety of techniques. Sometimes in this sort of fast military training, the warrior acts from an emotional base of fear and anger and not from real understanding. Misunderstanding and lack of insights in military training, and training that duplicates it, can leave a residue of negative emotions and fix the warrior in a sub-professional techniques, reactions and behavior.

A warrior or martial art practitioner who practices for a long time should be based in understanding so he can work out the optimal reaction to the many possibilities of violence.

Myamoto Musashi – a legendary Japanese swordsman from the 17th century, wrote in his book that a warrior should step into battle when his spirit is clean. In battle the warrior is under life threatening pressure that has physical and mental aspects. In this situation it is better to stay calm and sharp so the best solution will not be obscured. So better not to fight with fear, anger, hatred or any other strong emotion that might cloud our senses and affect our decision making. That, in my opinion and experience, is the ideal we should aspire to.

To understand fighting and have the correct fighting spirit we must train many years. Many training situations and various tests and encounters will promote our professionalism and give us the best set of tools to deal with violent situations. These tools can later be “left”, be “broken” to leave a clear no-mind attitude according to our individual insight and character.

New Capoeira techniques in the Martial arts encyclopedia



Shimi Blat

More then one third of the basic Capoeira techniques in video are now on the AKBAN-wiki.
These Capoeira techniques are another beginning.
af6e5924a5c199a63bb5
The Capoeira section highlights what can be done using the systematic AKBAN project atitude: To the Judo techniques, sword kata, Muai Tai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Budo Ninjutsu we can now start to add even more martial arts and systems.

The techniques in the encyclopedia are meant to be altered, improved and added to by users that have the uncontrollable urge to share knowledge.
These Brazilian techiques, for instance – Queda de rim and Rasteira do chão, were taken by ABADA Capoeira(Hebrew site). Many variations on these Capoeira techniques exist and we will definitely see them in the following months.
link to the Capoeira techniques category in the AKBAN-wiki

Slash resistant Apparel – knife protection


September 6, 2007
Viztum

A British company is now selling Kevlar lined shirts and hoodies. This meets the rising death toll in teenagers from knife attacks in London.
image/800px-No_hoodies_sign.jpg
As personal security is always on our scope, we spotted the protective apparel some months ago.
The slash resistant wear can protect the person wearing it from knife slashes and minor stabs and has been purchased by worried parents from Los Angeles and New York.
We liked the slash resistant hoody, of course, but the slash resistant glove is a gem too.

Link to the CBS news video
Link to the company selling this protective gear

Martial arts and childishness



Shay Dill

By Shay Dill
There’s always someone telling me I’m being childish. Of course, it starts with my mother who usually says, especially after an injury: “What where you thinking? When will you stop with this Ninjutsu stuff? When will you act your age?”
And it goes on with my wife who thinks that my version – “only those people who participate in some discipline or have a hobby are interesting” is a bit of a childish exaggeration.

Maybe one of the main characteristics of children is that they see things in either black or white. When you grow up you understand there are some grays. I stayed with my black and whites, somebody is either good or bad, I love something or hate it. Of course there are embers of grey. Grey is mostly an uninteresting color.

Some weeks ago I had a conversation with a remarkable lady. I told her that sometimes, when I look at people who do not practice, their lives look very boring. On the other side, when I look at people who train or have some discipline, their lives look more passionate, more involved.

There are many anecdotal contradictories – I met a guy who runs diligently and he’s a bore, or a girl riding a bicycle for triathlon that was even more dreary.

To go back to the interesting woman, she commented on my childish observations and said that her goal in life is to do whatever she does the best, perfection. I can honestly declare that I do not share this goal. I know that in order to do something perfectly you have to invest much more than if you aim for doing it 90% good. I’m sure that this post contains some mistakes but it doesn’t bother me enough. Maybe it’s because I never have spare time. My attitude is that once I get to the core goal, perfection is not that important.

The woman I was talking with, the one whose aim is “doing whatever she does perfectly” is the best mother I know. Alas, she does not understand a thing in martial arts. Does this mean she has uninteresting life just because I don’t see her at the dojo twice a week? Probably not; I stand corrected.

To get back to where I started, am I childish? Being childish is fun!! Life is simpler, colors are clearer and you sure have good time. In every instance someone tries to pin me back to the ground (not a training mattress but the grownup ground) I desist (unless it’s my wife. In that case I tell her she’s right, I’m sorry, I’ll try to be more mature – there’s no end to what a person has to do for a peaceful home).

Probably there is no clear-cut conclusion here. I gather now that other people have interesting life even though they do not train in martial arts, but when I immaturely compare, I see: we people have a common interest, a forward moving skill and we really do have fun. Maybe this is because martial arts in our school and in similar places attract people that essentially posses young spirit. Hey, just look around and see, so many people smiling. This is not the way adults look!!!