Brain interface – Neuralink surgical robot

  • The machine consists of three parts. There’s a “head,” which houses automated surgical tools and brain-scanning cameras and sensors, against which a patient situates their skull. A device first removes a portion of skull to be put back into place post-op. Then, computer vision algorithms guide a needle containing 5-micron-thick bundles of wires and insulation 6 millimeters into the brain, avoiding blood vessels. (Neuralink says the machine is technically capable of drilling to arbitrary lengths.) The wires — which measure a quarter of the diameter of a human hair (4 to 6 μm) — link to a series of electrodes at different locations and depths. At maximum capacity, the machine can insert six threads containing 192 electrodes per minute. (link)
29/08/2020